Tuesday, September 2, 2014

The Linux Setup - Stefano Zacchiroli, Former Debian Project Leader

Stefano is my great white whale. I’ve been trying to interview him for years, so I was very excited when he was able to make some time for this. He’s a Debian user, as you might expect from a former Debian Project Leader. Stefano also has a lot of nice things to say about GNOME Shell. And mutt users will want to check out his software list, as there’s a lot of nice Emacs integrations in there.

You can find more of The Linux Setup here.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here and follow me on Twitter here.

  1. Who are you, and what do you do?

    My name is Stefano Zacchiroli, but I usually go by the nickname “Zack.” I’m a computer science researcher and teacher, as well as a Free Software activist. I’m a Debian Developer, former three-time Debian Project Leader, and a Director at the Open Source Initiative (OSI).

    These days my Debian involvement is mostly in Quality Assurance and in the development of infrastructure pieces like Debian Sources. In the past I’ve maintained many packages, e.g., the OCaml stack, Vim, and various Python modules.

  2. Why do you use Linux?

    I use Free Software in general—Linux, GNU, GNOME, end-user applications, etc.—to be in control of my own computations. I love the feeling of knowing that I can peek at any point in the software stack, make the changes that I see fit, and share any bit I please with my peers. I refuse to believe that software is a black box, remotely controlled by someone else, and that users should need permission to exercise elementary digital rights on software.

  3. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

    Debian testing. It’s just the best (not to mention the first) “rolling release” out there: it offers a great trade-off between software freshness and not being too bleeding edge for use on your productivity machine.

  4. What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?

    GNOME 3 with GNOME Shell. Philosophically, I like the GNOME project, their vision, and the courage they have had to reinvent the desktop after many years in which nobody was innovating. But I’m also technically quite happy about GNOME Shell. I love full-text searching for applications, the big switch to mute notifications, the no-frills approach, and the well-rounded app integration.

    The only feature I miss in off-the-shelf GNOME Shell is tiling window management (there is some tiling support in GNOME Shell, like splitting the screen in half with two main windows, but I do use more complex window arrangements than that). To fill that gap I’m using the Shellshape extension; the result is good enough for my needs.

  5. What one piece of software do you depend upon with this distribution? Why is it so important?

    To give an idea of my work flow, here is a list of tools that I use on a daily basis (in no particular order):

    • mutt
    • notmuch (with mutt integration)
    • Emacs (in client/server mode)
    • git
    • git-annex
    • org-mode (again, with mutt integration)
    • Chromium (although I’m considering switching back to Firefox)
    • screen
    • irssi
    • ssh (and more and more often mosh)
    • ikiwiki
  6. What kind of hardware do you run this setup on?

    My main hardware is my laptop, which I always carry with me. I’m now at my third iteration of (Lenovo) ThinkPads over a period of more than six years and, overall, I’m a satisfied user. As a geek I mostly interact with my OS by typing, and ThinkPad’s keyboards are just unparalleled, in my estimation.

    My current ThinkPad is a T440s, i7 CPU, 12GB RAM, 512GB SSD, and a Full HD display (not touchscreen, as I don’t see the point of it). My main regret with ThinkPads is the need to use non-free firmware to get the Intel Wi-Fi working.

    Dear Intel, would you please give up on that, liberate your firmware, and finally set your users free?

    When at the office I connect my laptop to an external LCD monitor and the best mechanical keyboard I’ve ever used: a Das Keyboard Model S Ultimate. To ease the connection, I use a basic Lenovo docking station, and I also have many (five or more, I think) Lenovo-ish AC adapters: one for the office, one near the couch at home, one for each backpack, etc.

  7. Will you share a screenshot of your desktop?

    Sure!

    Here is my GNOME Shell workspace three, the one I use for the main ongoing “work” activity during a typical coding session. In the screenshot you can see three windows, tailed automatically by Shellshape: Emacs for coding, Evince for doc reading, and a GNOME terminal running tests (in case you’re wondering, no, I refuse to use Emacs as an entire OS, and I dislike running “terminals” in it).

Stefano Zacchiroli's desktop

Interview conducted July 28, 2014


The Linux Setup is a feature where I interview people about their Linux setups. The concept is borrowed, if not outright stolen, from this site. If you’d like to participate, drop me a line.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.


Tuesday, July 8, 2014

The Linux Setup - Julien Palard, meltygroup CTO

Julien’s interview is a love letter to tiling window managers. And he makes the fascinating argument that smartphones and tablets all use full-screen tiling. Julien is the CTO of meltygroup, a Gawker-esque collection of news sites, so it’s especially cool to see that Debian is not only powering his servers, but also his work computer.

You can find more of The Linux Setup here.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here and follow me on Twitter here.

  1. Who are you, and what do you do?

    https://www.google.fr/search?q=julien+palard

    EDITOR’S NOTE: Hint

  2. Why do you use Linux?

    You mean versus Windows? I think I started using Linux because I needed to understand what was wrong when something went wrong. But now I find it far faster to work with bash than a graphical interface (you know, the kind of interface where one searches for an icon on a whole screen of icons).

  3. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

    Debian — Stable for my servers, Testing for my laptop (to work), and Testing on my desktop (shared with family at home, with a media player, etc…)

  4. What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?

    I started around 10 years ago with Window Maker. A few years later I switched to Openbox. I loved the scriptable menus big time, but now I use i3. Why i3? Why a tiling window manager? Because it saves time. I used to only work with windows in full screen (a full-screen terminal, a full-screen Firefox, etc…) so not having to resize them saves time. You think I’m an extremist and that normal people HAVE to get resizable and movable windows? You’re wrong. Take a look at your smartphone and your tablet—tiling window managers are now the norm.

  5. What one piece of software do you depend upon with this distribution? Why is it so important?

    I don’t think I’m Debian-dependent, but I depend on a huge amount of software for everything. I use bash, emacs, echo, grep, sed, awk, find, ls, cut, ping, dig, git, cal, date, cat, and so many, many others…

  6. What kind of hardware do you run this setup on?

    Actually I’m on my desktop. It’s a fanless 8GB, Core i3, 128GB SSD because I don’t want to hear a fan while listening music. My work laptop is a Samsung Series 9. I had hard time finding a QWERTY one in France. I finally found an American shop that would ship one to France. I can’t work on an AZERTY keyboard because symbols are not paired, which is odd. I used to have an Eee PC, with an AZERTY keyboard, but QWERTY mapping. As long as I didn’t look at my keyboard, it worked.

  7. Will you share a screenshot of your desktop?

    It’s an almost unconfigured i3wm with a black background, so there’s nothing to see here—only the i3status on the bottom.

Julien Palard's desktop

Interview conducted May 4, 2014


The Linux Setup is a feature where I interview people about their Linux setups. The concept is borrowed, if not outright stolen, from this site. If you’d like to participate, drop me a line.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.


Tuesday, June 10, 2014

The Linux Setup - Sean Cross, Novena Developer

I’m not a big hardware guy. At all. Specs mean very little to me. However, Sean’s hardware is interesting, as it’s a Novena, something he developed himself. And of course, because he’s working with Linux, he’s able to get things to run pretty well. I have no idea what the future of the Novena is, but I love that people can make new devices that will be able to access familiar software and interfaces. Microsoft is making Windows cost-free for certain devices. It’s a smarter strategy than charging manufacturers, but until they let people get under the hood of the code, they’re going to have a hard time reaching new, experimental devices. Which is actually OK with me, since I’m happy to have Linux in as many places as possible.

You can find more of The Linux Setup here.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here and follow me on Twitter here.

  1. Who are you, and what do you do?

    My name is Sean “xobs” Cross and I am an American living in Singapore. In the past I’ve worked on release firmware for Chumby, including the Chumby One and Chumby 8 devices. Now I’m building the firmware for Novena, along with the Senoko battery controller board.

  2. Why do you use Linux?

    Most of my work is done with embedded ARM devices, and while there are a number of full-featured operating systems for ARM, none has more support than Linux. Major alternatives include Windows and Android, but Windows CE 7 wasn’t very good for compatibility, I can’t even try Windows 8 without a source license, and while Android is great for tablets and phones it isn’t very good with multitasking and multiple windows.

    Linux allows me to run the same major open-source applications that are developed on x86 with little more than a recompile. My ARM laptop runs Thunderbird, Firefox, Pidgin, VLC, and XChat, and has a good PDF reader, terminal program, and file manager. Most importantly it is capable of rebuilding everything from source, which helps in tracking down weird and exotic bugs that crop up when developing a system from scratch.

    Linux allows me to get a full desktop environment, even on oddball hardware, which is a feature no other operating system can provide.

  3. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

    Debian Wheezy is my current distro of choice. A big selling point is that they have an armhf build, which allows me to take advantage of the NEON VFP floating point unit in the Cortex A9 CPU. Also important is that it doesn’t assume the platform it’s running on has 3D acceleration, which has caused other distros to fail miserably. An added bonus is that the kernel will run without additional distro-specific patches, which made the port easy.

    From a user experience angle, Wheezy supports modesetting, which allows me to hotplug my HDMI monitor as I move from home to the office. Many distros make assumptions about Xorg drivers that aren’t true on Novena, or don’t support modesetting at all. Modesetting and LibreOffice allows me to give multi monitor presentations, which is a nice touch.

  4. What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?

    Xfce4 is my current desktop of choice. It supports multiple monitors and works without hardware acceleration (which is still a work in progress on Novena). I like its support for panel widgets, which allow me to monitor CPU frequency as the governor changes the speed of the processor, and I like the detailed at-a-glance battery reporting, which let me know how the Senoko battery controller is doing.

  5. What one piece of software do you depend upon with this distribution? Why is it so important?

    With this distro, the package manager is most important because any library or software package I find myself needing is only an “apt-get install” away. Sometimes a package can be difficult to locate by name, in which case “apt-file” can be used to search for the actual package name.

    For actual Linux work, the compiler is the tool I rely on most. In addition to translating C and C++ code to machine language, it has an added benefit of exercising the disk channel, DDR memory, and all four processor cores. Recompiling the kernel is a reasonable first order test of system stability. Having a fully functional compiler on the system itself also means I don’t have to worry about a cross compiler on a separate system, which makes it easier to compile and link against unusual libraries, a process that can be awkward when cross compiling.

  6. What kind of hardware do you run this setup on?

    I run on Novena, a quad core 1.2 GHz ARM board with 4GB RAM. It has a 1920x1080 internal LCD, and I frequently run with a second 1920x1200 HDMI monitor connected externally.

  7. Will you share a screenshot of your desktop?

    Yes!

Sean Cross's desktop

Interview conducted April 19, 2014


The Linux Setup is a feature where I interview people about their Linux setups. The concept is borrowed, if not outright stolen, from this site. If you’d like to participate, drop me a line.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.


Tuesday, May 13, 2014

The Linux Setup - Louis Pilfold, DJ

I found Louis in an odd way. There was a reddit thread which taught me about xwax, which is Linux DJ software. I went to the xwax site and found Louis through their email list. I’m always interested in people who can use Linux to make music and Louis does just that, using not just xwax, but also i3 to manage his windows. It’s a simple setup that lets Louis focus on music and not on navigating a desktop. Plus, he gets to watch records spin, instead of a colorful beach ball.

You can find more of The Linux Setup here.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here and follow me on Twitter here.

  1. Who are you, and what do you do?

    I’m Louis Pilfold, I work for a London print/software-as-a-service company doing web development, site administration, automation, that kind of thing. I’m also a music lover who DJs electronic music with a Linux computer and a pair of turntables.

  2. Why do you use Linux?

    Countless reasons — I’m quite the Linux fanatic. The biggest one for me is probably the level of choice that Linux allows you. With Linux you can really customize your computer to suit your tastes and needs, and for me that means a degree of minimalism, efficient keyboard-driven control, and tools that don’t get in your way while you’re trying to work. I also thoroughly enjoy the community aspect of Linux and libre software, and believe that libre software is the ethically superior option.

  3. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

    I run Debian on all my machines: stable on my server, and testing on all the others. I start with a network installation (netinst) with just the base utilities, and work up from there. I use Debian specifically because it’s a community project, it has a great (if slightly old) range of software in the repositories, and it’s stable enough for me to not have to worry about tricky maintenance or show-stopping bugs. When you rely on a machine for live performance, stability really matters.

  4. What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?

    These days I tend to just use a window manager with some carefully selected supplementary applications, rather than a full desktop environment. I’ve fairly recently fallen in love with i3, a dynamic tiling window manager. Being able to quickly and precisely do everything I want to do from the keyboard is a fantastic productivity booster, and is much easier on the wrists than using the mouse.

    If you’re interested in my desktop configuration you can find my dotfiles and some notes on GitHub.

  5. What one piece of software do you depend upon with this distribution? Why is it so important?

    As a Linux DJ, the one piece of software I really depend upon is Mark Hill’s xwax. xwax is a minimalistic digital vinyl emulation system. It allows me to manipulate digital media (such as FLAC and mp3 files) with turntables, as if I had that track on actual vinyl. This is great as you can’t always get the music you want on vinyl, and there’s lots of little tricks you can do with software that you couldn’t do with a more traditional setup. Not having to carry a huge bag of records is great, too.

    It’s quite a simple system — I use special vinyl records called ‘timecode’ records, which contain a particular tone. The audio from these records is routed out of the turntables and into my computer through a USB audio interface. Once there, the software inspects the tone to determine the speed, direction of rotation, and position of the record, and then manipulates the mp3/FLAC audio to match, before sending it back out of the audio interface to the speakers. Even with a modest computer xwax can make this all can all happen in two or three milliseconds, so it feels as real and responsive as real vinyl records.

    Currently, I use proprietary timecode records made by a company called Serato, though there is talk in the xwax community of cutting our own open source timecode records. Exciting stuff!

  6. What kind of hardware do you run this setup on?

    My desktop computer is rather unremarkable; all lower tier components from a year or two ago, but I’ve got some really nice peripherals:

    • 1440p 27” Dell Ultrasharp display
    • Reloop Wave 8 studio reference speakers
    • Numark TTX turntables
    • Ecler Nuo 2.0 DJ mixer
    • Native Instruments “Audio 4 DJ” USB audio interface
    • KBT Pure Pro 60% size mechanical keyboard.

    I also use a ThinkPad x220 laptop.

  7. Will you share a screenshot of your desktop?

    Of course. You can see xwax running there on the right hand side.

Louis Pilfold's desktop

Interview conducted March 26, 2014


The Linux Setup is a feature where I interview people about their Linux setups. The concept is borrowed, if not outright stolen, from this site. If you’d like to participate, drop me a line.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.


Tuesday, February 4, 2014

The Linux Setup - Aaron Toponce, Director of System Administration

I first ran into Aaron via his essay about leaving Ubuntu. Aaron’s obviously a thoughtful technologist and that thoughtfulness comes through in his description of his setup, which is fantastic. His IRC workflow alone could almost be the subject of a book. And I love that he works in an office environment that prohibits Windows. That’s the dream for a lot of us (especially those of us who have spent some time with Windows 8).

You can find more of The Linux Setup here.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here and follow me on Twitter here.

  1. Who are you, and what do you do?

    My name is Aaron Toponce. I am the Director of System Administration for a Utah based ISP named XMission. I am in charge of a couple of hundred servers, in varying degrees: mail servers, web servers, shared hosting, hypervisors, storage, etc. I even act as a failover network engineer for smallish problems. Just about everything we run is Ubuntu LTS on the server, and workstations must either be a GNU/Linux operating system or Mac OS X. Windows is too vulnerable to trust on our office network.

    Pete Ashdown is my boss. You’ve probably heard of him. He has been getting a lot of press lately standing up to the NSA, not allowing them access to the infrastructure at all. It’s awesome working for him, and working for such a great company.

  2. Why do you use Linux?

    I started using GNU/Linux back in 1999, shortly after I got married. We were in need of a new computer, and being poor newly weds, I didn’t have the money to fork over for a brand new computer. So, I purchased a used one, but it had Windows 95 on it. My wife was a big Mac OS user (pre- OS X even), and I didn’t care for the Windows 95 interface. So, I was interested in something new.

    While at an electronics company, and browsing the bundled software aisle, I saw a box for Red Hat Linux 6, for $40. I had heard of Linux before, and knew it was an operating system, or something, so I figured I would give it a try. I installed it on our used computer, only to accidentally remove the Windows 95 installation. Eventually, I learned about dual booting, partitions, and formatting filesystems. :)

    After getting a handle on things, I learned about Free Software and the GNU movement. I agreed with the ethics of Free Software, and in 2001, dropped all proprietary software from my personal computers, running only Free Software. My wife still had a Windows XP install until 2008, when it got a nasty virus, and she switched back to OS X.

    I use GNU/Linux now, rather than Mac OS X or Windows, because it offers everything I need as a system administrator and light developer. I’m familiar with the interfaces, the tools, and getting around the operating system. I know how to troubleshoot anything that is thrown my way, without much trouble, and usually, I can fix the problem. I still strongly believe in the ethics of Free Software, and that also drives my decision to choose the software that I do.

  3. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

    I run Debian GNU/Linux on all of my machines. This includes my desktop, my Lenovo T61 laptop, and my HP netbook. If I could run Debian on my phone, I would.

  4. What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?

    I prefer Awesome. I’ve always been a big tiling window manager user. On my netbook, I ran DWM for a couple years because it just got out of the way, and allowed me to take as much advantage of screen real estate as I could. Then I discovered Awesome, and have been running that since.

    Configuring power management on a laptop with something that doesn’t do it automatically for you, like GNOME or KDE however is a challenge. But once you get everything in shape, Awesome WM is very, very pleasant to use.

  5. What one piece of software do you depend upon with this distribution? Why is it so important?

    I rely on ZNC, WeeChat, tmux and Bitlbee more than anything. But, they aren’t running on the computer from which the screenshot came from.

    I’ve been an IRC junky since roughly 2002, and have been permanently connected since 2005. All of my main communication go through it one way or another. Further, XMission uses IRC for all internal communication, and has Nagios, SMS, fax, and other bots configured to use it also (XMission was started in 1993, before XMPP or other more “modern” chat solutions existed).

    As such, I’ve created a Python script that sends an SMS alert to my phone while I am marked as “/away” in the IRC client. This way, I will always get notified of highlights or private messages. This has been critical for keeping on top of issues at work, and has also allowed me to see who is sharing my blog, and other things, in the many IRC channels that I hang out in.

    My setup has the ZNC bouncer running on a virtual machine. Bitlbee is running locally also, and is always connected to ZNC. Furthermore, I’ve launched WeeChat behind tmux on the same virtual machine, so I can take advantage of some WeeChat scripts. When I disconnect from tmux, then WeeChat will mark me as away automatically, which means I will then get push notifications of highlights and private messages, to my phone. In Bitlbee, I have some XMPP bots for various push notifications also.

    Long story short, this virtual machine is a messaging hub that I rely on for live push notifications that are important to me. And they all use SMS, so I don’t need to keep a running data connection on my phone, to save battery.

  6. What kind of hardware do you run this setup on?

    I have two hypervisors that are using a shared ZFS storage using GlusterFS connected via 20 Gb Inifiniband. Each hypervisor has 8 AMD cores, with 32GB of DDR2 ECC registered ram. Each server has 4x1 TB drives in a ZFS RAID 1+0. Both hypervisors are running Debian GNU/Linux stable, and using KVM for the virtualization layer. The virtual machines are using image files rather than block devices to take advantage of the clustering for HA. My messaging VM has 1GB of RAM with 2 cores and 100GB of disk.

    You can read more about the setup here: https://plus.google.com/+AaronToponce/posts/CTDeruUFMse

  7. Will you share a screenshot of your desktop?

    I have three monitors connected using Xinerama (yeah, I don’t care about the wobbly windows or GPU acceleration). They are each Dell U2410 connected via DVI.

    On the left monitor is my main “monitoring” view. I have a custom Perl script I wrote for showing Nagios/Icinga alerts in a terminal. Working for an ISP means I’m also monitoring border traffic. So, I have a custom Perl script monitoring that. On the other workspaces are Nagstamon, virt-manager, and some custom tools for work.

    In the middle monitor, is my main messaging monitor. You can see IRC occupying most of the screen, with three separate Mutt instances on the right: personal, work and shool. On the other workspaces are Bitmessage, Thunderbord, and Hotot.

    On the right monitor is mainly my browser. In the screenshot, it’s viewing a Munin installation, in this case looking into a disk warning with one of our Exim servers. On the other workspaces are KeepassX and Zim.

Aaron Toponce's desktop

Interview conducted November 19, 2013


The Linux Setup is a feature where I interview people about their Linux setups. The concept is borrowed, if not outright stolen, from this site. If you’d like to participate, drop me a line.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.


Monday, January 6, 2014 Monday, November 25, 2013

The Linux Setup - Alberto Garcia, Software Developer

It’s no secret that a lot of people love OS X. My theory is that they love it because it makes sense to them and jives with their workflow, not that it’s inherently better than anything else. I say that not as an OS X hater but as someone who believes usability is subjective to a certain degree. I bet an even greater number of people love Windows the same way, but we probably don’t hear as much from them, possibly because they don’t realize there are other operating systems…

As Alberto points out, the strength of Linux is that it can be changed into whatever we need. So for those of us who don’t feel served by Windows and OS X, desktop Linux is the opportunity to create our own personal operating system. It’s harder than using stock setups, but the results are much more rewarding.

You can find more of The Linux Setup here.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here and follow me on Twitter here.

  1. Who are you, and what do you do?

    My name is Alberto Garcia. I’m a free software developer and one of the founding members of Igalia, an open source consultancy. Since the creation of the company I have worked in many different areas, but I was particularly involved in the Maemo/MeeGo platforms. Then I worked for a while in virtualization and device drivers, and at the moment I’m working on the WebKit GTK+ port. I’m also a Debian developer.

  2. Why do you use Linux?

    I started using it at university. First, because coming from the DOS/Windows world, it was something new and exciting. It was also very convenient: most servers and workstations we had at university were running some version of Unix, so with Linux, I could have a similar working environment at home.

    Back then it was not trivial to set up and tune the operating system, so I spent quite some time making things work. However, with that I learned an important thing: having complete and unrestricted access to the source code was something really powerful, and it made me realize this was how I wanted all of my software to be.

    Software should be a tool to make people’s lives easier. Putting restrictions on a program to prevent people from doing what they want to with it does the opposite.

    I liked the idea so much that I decided I wanted to work as close to that ideal as possible. Luckily, I found the right people and we founded Igalia with free software as one of our core values.

  3. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

    I’ve been using Debian since the beginning, and that’s my distribution of choice in all my computers. In 1997 there were not so many other choices, and I think Debian was already quite solid. If I recall correctly, it also included a larger selection of software than most of the alternatives.

    I also like the idea that it’s entirely developed by a community of volunteers that anyone can join, which is why I decided to become a Debian developer myself.

    Of course I had the chance to try other distributions during all these years, but to be honest, I never saw a strong reason to consider switching.

  4. What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?

    I’ve been using GNOME for a long time. We started working with it at Igalia in the early years because we saw in it a promising desktop environment and development platform.

    As much as I like to be able to tweak and modify my software, I also like it to get out of the way when I want to work, and I think GNOME succeeds pretty well in that. I’m also satisfied with all of the recent developments and I’m a happy GNOME 3 user.

  5. What one piece of software do you depend upon with this distribution? Why is it so important?

    Leaving my Debian developer tasks aside, I don’t think I depend on anything specific to Debian in my daily work.

    I spend most of my time inside a source code repository, so my essential tools are git and Emacs. I also use mutt and notmuch to read my e-mail. Then of course there’s also the standard programs that everyone uses: a music player, a web browser — but I don’t have strong preferences with those. But I use the Epiphany webapp mode a lot.

  6. What kind of hardware do you run this setup on?

    I’m using a ThinkPad X230 with an i7 processor, 12GB of RAM and an SSD hard drive. I’ve been using ThinkPads for years and I’m quite happy with them. They work pretty well with Linux and most hardware features work out of the box. I’m also so used to the trackpoint that I cannot see myself without it now.

  7. Will you share a screenshot of your desktop?

    There it goes. It’s GNOME 3 with a few extensions, a couple of Emacs instances, a few shells, IRC client, web browser and media player.

Alberto Garcia's desktop

Interview conducted October 2, 2013


The Linux Setup is a feature where I interview people about their Linux setups. The concept is borrowed, if not outright stolen, from this site. If you’d like to participate, drop me a line.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.


Friday, November 8, 2013