Tuesday, October 7, 2014

The Linux Setup - Sudhir Khanger, Android Developer

Sudhir is a KDE-loving Android developer. Like most KDE users, he really loves KDE. Sudhir also makes a great point about the economics of free and open source software, pointing out that in many parts of the world, people don’t have the money to pay for software. And if they do have the money, they don’t have a mechanism, other than cash, to pay for software, putting much of the world of fee-based software out of their reach. Linux helps not just people who don’t want to pay for software, but also people who have no way (either financially or technically) to pay for software.

You can find more of The Linux Setup here.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here and follow me on Twitter here.

  1. Who are you, and what do you do?

    I am biologist by training. After a few years of changing battery icons and themes, and of installing custom ROMs and kernels, my ability to hack Android came to a halt. I had to learn programming in order to continue having the fun. I took Mehran Sahami’s online course, Introduction to Computer Programming - Programming Methodology to learn Java. I was already spending way too much time thinking about Android so I decided to take the plunge and become an Android developer. That makes me an aspiring Android developer.

    I am also know to, frenetically, make 100 words random posts on my blog sudhirkhanger.com.

  2. Why do you use Linux?

    I started using Linux in summer of 2007. I am not sure what instigated my desire to try Linux other than I had too much time on my hand during my freshman year. I didn’t know what open source was back then. I find that Linux is really easy to use because it tells you what it is doing. At its core everything is a text file.

    Over the years Linux has allowed me to do so many things that I otherwise would not have had access to. You want to become a graphic artist? Install Krita. You want to be a writer? Install LibreOffice. Where do you get freedom like that?

    Not everybody in my home country is going to be able to pay Adobe’s premium yearly subscription. Half of them don’t even have bank accounts—how are they going to get credit cards to make online purchases? Linux completely changes everything in such an environment.

    I am also slowly moving away from all third-party, hosted technologies to locally-controlled GNU software. It is important to take control of your own data.

  3. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

    Fedora is my preferred GNU/Linux distribution.

    I began with Ubuntu but as you know six months down the line it gets really old. If the kernel that was shipped with Ubuntu has a bug you have to live with that for at least six months. That made me switch to Arch Linux. Arch is probably the best Linux distribution. It has a solid base, high quality documentation and the Arch User Repository, which solves the age-old problem of how to distribute software in an easy way.

    After I started working on Android I needed a distribution that changed enough that I had latest of most things but also provided a stable and consistent user experience. Fedora is an obvious choice in this space. Packages are fairly up-to-date. I really enjoy using it.

  4. What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?

    I am a KDE user. KDE provides me a consistent environment that isn’t available with any other Linux desktop environments. It is designed for power users and can be tweaked to fit any workflow. All applications follow the same design guidelines and use KDE desktop elements like notifications. Other desktop environments don’t really have anything like Kontact, which is a personal information management suite of applications. Overall KDE is a great desktop experience.

  5. What one piece of software do you depend upon with this distribution? Why is it so important?

    Chrome, Eclipse, and Android Studio are pretty must-have software for my work.

    KMail, Dolphin, Banshee, Emacs, Konsole, Konversation, and ownCloud are also essential to my workflow.

  6. What kind of hardware do you run this setup on?

    My primary work laptop is a Thinkpad T420i.

  7. Will you share a screenshot of your desktop?

Sudhir Khanger's desktop

Interview conducted August 7, 2014


The Linux Setup is a feature where I interview people about their Linux setups. The concept is borrowed, if not outright stolen, from this site. If you’d like to participate, drop me a line.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.


Tuesday, September 9, 2014

The Linux Setup - Eric Mesa, Programmer/Blogger

Eric’s a KDE user who makes use of Activities to create virtual desktops for different kinds of work. Like a lot of KDE users, Eric likes that desktop environment because of the granular control it gives him over his system. KDE isn’t for everyone, but people who know how to use it seem to really stick with it. I’ve never been able to really solve KDE for myself, but I remain ever hopeful that one day I might figure it out.

You can find more of The Linux Setup here.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here and follow me on Twitter here.

  1. Who are you, and what do you do?

    My name is Eric Mesa. My day job is to program and manage programmers, but I’m also a blogger and I cover the comics industry. I’ll be attending Baltimore Comic-Con as press again this year.

  2. Why do you use Linux?

    I first came to Linux in 2003 when I was trying to figure out how to run my own server. I did some research and saw that you could do that with Linux. So I went to the local bookstore (I think it was a Borders) and found a book on Fedora Core 1 (as it was known back then). I installed it on an old computer I bought for like $25 and was off.

    Nowadays I use Linux because I believe in the principles of free software. To me, Linux is the DRM-free OS. I don’t buy DRM-encumbered movies, music, or books. Why should I buy DRM-encumbered operating systems? I want to make my computer do whatever I want it to do, not what some corporation wants it to do. Also, I love that a Linux desktop is fully functional without spending money. I have spent or donated money for software, but I’m glad you don’t have to. As the world becomes more dependent upon computing, I think it’s important for those with less access to money to still have access to up-to-date and world-class operating systems.

  3. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

    I use Fedora—been there since the beginning—on my desktop and laptop. My wife’s computer and laptop run Kubuntu because Ubuntu’s traditionally been a lot easier for in-place upgrades.

  4. What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?

    I use KDE 4.x on all the computers in my house (Fedora or Kubuntu). I use it because it is infinitely configurable. GNOME 3 is when I stopped using GNOME and went back to KDE. I also make HUGE use of the Activities to have sets of virtual desktops. I just love how KDE respects the user’s vision—it is the most Linux of desktop environments.

  5. What one piece of software do you depend upon with this distribution? Why is it so important?

    A while ago I would have said Blender, when I was really active in 3D animation. Now it’s Amarok. I LOVE the Amarok music player. I’ve written over and over about everything I love about the way it allows me to create dynamic playlists and the way it presents the music.

  6. What kind of hardware do you run this setup on?

    My desktop is a 6 Core AMD computer with 8GB RAM and an nVidia graphics card.

  7. Will you share a screenshot of your desktop?

    Because I use so many Activities, I’m not sure how many screenshots you’d like. You can start at https://www.flickr.com/photos/ericsbinaryworld/13961741879/in/photostream/ and then go (left arrow) until the desktop screenshots end.

Eric Mesa's desktop

Interview conducted July 28, 2014


The Linux Setup is a feature where I interview people about their Linux setups. The concept is borrowed, if not outright stolen, from this site. If you’d like to participate, drop me a line.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.


Tuesday, June 17, 2014

The Linux Setup - Tom Callaway, Red Hat

As near as I can tell, the overlap between hockey fans and Linux fans is pretty small. By my informal, unscientific count, there’s me, there’s Jorge Castro, and now we can add Tom Callaway to the list. I actually found him through a shared disdain for NBC’s NHL coverage but his Linux credentials are very impressive. Tom is a GNOME user who takes advantage of its extensive extension collection. I know GNOME has taken some customization options out of the base install, but with extensions, I sometimes wonder if there isn’t more flexibility in the project now.

You can find more of The Linux Setup here.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here and follow me on Twitter here.

  1. Who are you, and what do you do?

    My name is Inigo Mont… err… Tom Callaway. I’ve been interested in Linux and FOSS in general since 1997, and employed by Red Hat since 2001. My current job is in the Open Source & Standards team in the Red Hat CTO Office. I am leading up the effort within Red Hat to promote Free and Open Source Software in education. I also do work to promote open hardware and support 3D printers on Fedora. Last, but not least, I handle Fedora’s legal issues (but am not a lawyer). I maintain around 300 packages in Fedora.

  2. Why do you use Linux?

    I started using Linux because I was frustrated at how inflexible Windows was. I still use it because I believe in the power of FOSS to innovate, and I love digging into things, discovering how they work, and making changes.

  3. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

    Fedora 20.

  4. What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?

    I’ve upgraded to GNOME 3.12, with a number of extensions to make it more usable for me. Currently, I use these:

  5. What one piece of software do you depend upon with this distribution? Why is it so important?

    Hmm. I’m not sure I depend on one particular piece of software. I tend to use Thunderbird an awful lot for email, calendar and RSS reading.

    The apps I open on startup are:

    • XChat
    • Pidgin
    • Pithos (Pandora GUI client)
    • gnome-terminal
    • Firefox
    • Thunderbird
    • Corebird (Twitter GUI client)
    • Tomboy (sticky notes)
  6. What kind of hardware do you run this setup on?

    A Lenovo T440s laptop. It’s Quad Core i7-4600U @ 2.10GHz, 12GB memory, 256GB SSD. When I’m in the office, it runs in a dock with a second screen attached to it. At home, I usually connect a second monitor and my office TV to it (love that screen real estate).

  7. Will you share a screenshot of your desktop?

    Sure! I’ll even leave some of my windows unminimized.

Tom Callaway's desktop

Interview conducted April 21, 2014


The Linux Setup is a feature where I interview people about their Linux setups. The concept is borrowed, if not outright stolen, from this site. If you’d like to participate, drop me a line.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.


Thursday, April 24, 2014 Wednesday, April 16, 2014

The Linux Setup - Robert Nunnally, Musician/Attorney

Robert has a great story. He was a Linux enthusiast in theory who became one in practice when he could no longer run the Windows programs he wanted to run. It’s the perfect story for this moment, because as this is being written, Windows finally ended support for XP after 13 years (making Debian look downright bleeding-edge). I suspect a lot of XP users will experiment with Linux, because if you stayed with XP for this long, there’s something very specific about it that you like and odds are Windows 7 and Windows 8 aren’t going to address that need. Linux provides a flexibility that will allow at least some XP refugees to create a familiar experience on their computers. That’s what brought Robert to Linux and it’s what kept him there.

You can find more of The Linux Setup here.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here and follow me on Twitter here.

  1. Who are you, and what do you do?

    My name is Robert Nunnally. I grew up in Arkansas, USA. I now live in Allen, Texas. By day, I am an attorney who handles cases involving commercial litigation, insurance company rehabilitation and liquidation, and intellectual property. My wife and I live with a little black shelter-adopted dog 25 miles north of Dallas, on the edge of the prairie.

    My passion/avocation is to share Creative Commons music under my performing name, Gurdonark. I am active at the music site ccMixter.org, and have released a number of releases on netlabels. My music appears in documentaries, museum exhibits, Android games, podcasts and in thousands of online videos. I also like to share Creative Commons photos, and I am an avid-if-non-expert birder and chess player.

    I run a little cloudcast on Mixcloud, sharing culture commentary and interviews, called the Graham Wafercast.

  2. Why do you use Linux?

    I run Linux for two reasons. I believe strongly in sharing culture—open source, liberal licensing and Creative Commons culture. I believe that our culture deserves an alternative to the royalty-based culture. I do not oppose intellectual property laws, but rather support liberal licensing to create a vast public commons of freely-available work. I am all about Creative Commons BY, donate-what-you-will and a a culture of attribution.

    I also use Linux for a very pragmatic reason. I have owned a Linux machine for years. My first Linux netbook was the (in)famous Cherrypal Africa, the sub-$100 machine from an pre-Android era, when sub-$100 sounded like an impressive price. This very simple netbook offered the advantage of nearly-instantaneous boot and a vaguely KDE set up, but lacked a proper command line, a proper package manager with access to repositories, and even proper stereo. It was fun for play and basic browsing (an xBurst chip pushing Konqueror a mighty 800 MHz), but it failed to suffice for daily use.

    Years later, @lopta on Twitter turned me on to running Linux in virtual machines. I loved being able to load up Debian, Peppermint, Damn Small Linux, Puppy and more distros than I can count, onto a VMWare player. I began to see how easy Linux for the desktop had become.

    I mentor through the Big Brothers Big Sister program. I found that my little brother lacked a laptop computer, which I considered a significant omission. The digital divide concerns me. I went on eBay, got him a used computer for $50, and loaded it with Linux (at first Pear, which proved too heavyweight, but then we loaded on Xubuntu, which was just right). Within weeks, he was using it regularly, changing out distros, and enjoying it thoroughly.

    Our experiment with his system worked so well that I got myself an eBay computer for $53, plus a $3 case, from Goodwill. I loaded Linux on it and although it only had a U1400 1.2 GHz single-core chip, the computer became my daily driver.

    I loved the free software and the ability to customize and change things. I moved from Linux supporter to Linux convert. I eventually converted my desktop to Linux and then ordered a new pre-configured Linux rig.

    This preface leads me into the second reason for the change. I changed to Linux in part because only Linux could easily help me use my XP music-making software. I make offbeat electronic music with a strong ambient influence (so-called “weirdbient” music). I use a lot of software developed as freeware or shareware in an XP environment. I found when I got my first Windows 7 computer that much of my essential software would not run in it. I read that almost all of my favorite music software would not run in Windows 8. Although Microsoft had developed virtual machine technology to help alleviate this issue, I learned that the VM solution would require the additional purchase of an enterprise license.

    On the other hand, I now have all of my favorite software installed to run via WINE in my Linux rig. I can also easily set up a VM via VirtualBox (or GNOME Boxes) if I need an XP virtual machine at some point in the future.

    Thus, I switched to Linux because I believe in sharing culture, and because switching to Linux set me free of the treadmill of software being rendered obsolete due to operating system changes.

  3. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

    I use Fedora 20. I got some good advice to go that route from a Fedora user who works for Red Hat, and I’ve been happy with it. I am not at all an operating system zealot, though. I like lots of them, and run them on VMs for fun. Lately, I am taken with the CorePlus spin of Tiny Core Linux. I like my systems lightweight.

  4. What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?

    I use LXDE. I originally loaded LXDE because I had a less powerful laptop. I found myself very attracted to its simplicity and ease of use. I like that it is so lightweight that it never burdens my system. I like, too, leaving my screen landscape free for a bird photo. My other favorite DE is Razor-Qt, which is what I use when I run Porteus via USB on my old “Windows” laptop.

  5. What one piece of software do you depend upon with this distribution? Why is it so important?

    I depend on Audacity. This helps me record my music and export it for re-use.

  6. What kind of hardware do you run this setup on?

    This year I got a ZaReason Limbo-6220A, with AMD’s FX-4130 as the CPU. I’ve been very happy with my ZaReason, which was pre-loaded at my request for Fedora 20 LXDE.

  7. Will you share a screenshot of your desktop?

Robert Nunnally's desktop

Interview conducted February 9, 2014


The Linux Setup is a feature where I interview people about their Linux setups. The concept is borrowed, if not outright stolen, from this site. If you’d like to participate, drop me a line.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.


Tuesday, March 25, 2014

The Linux Setup - Phil Baker, Lead Forecaster, National Weather Service

Weathermen are like rock stars. I remember when local New York City forecaster Nick Gregory came to my junior high school. Everyone was genuinely excited, and at that age, we were rarely excited about anything (except Faces of Death — man did we love that movie). It’s only gotten more glamorous for the weather industry. Gawker has a weather site. Nate Silver’s given weathermen his blessing. So it’s great to talk to Phil, who’s a Linux-using forecaster with the (U.S.) National Weather Service. He’s a GNOME fan who runs a simple setup that lets him try out different distros. And it’s yet another example of just how many different fields can successfully work with Linux desktops.

You can find more of The Linux Setup here.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here and follow me on Twitter here.

  1. Who are you, and what do you do?

    My name is Phil Baker. I’m a Lead Forecaster with the National Weather Service (NWS) in Memphis, TN. I’ve been with the NWS for 21 years (time flies!), after graduating from the University of Nebraska. While not officially on the IT side of the house, I help out the IT staff where I can, particularly when it comes to Linux or networking.

  2. Why do you use Linux?

    I was introduced to Unix in the late 90s. At that time, each NWS office had an HP-UX RISC workstation that was a precursor to our present day AWIPS infrastructure, which originally ran HP-UX. I bought my first PC in 1998 and Windows felt like a toy compared to Unix. About this time, a sysadmin at the office was testing a new operating system called “Linux” on a spare PC. I was intrigued. It definitely was not a toy and the shell commands I’d learned on HP-UX were transferable to this Linux box. I went home and installed Caldera Linux on my one-year-old PC, then quickly moved to Mandrake — “Red Hat with KDE,” as it was known back then. I’ve been running Linux ever since.

    Soon after Red Hat introduced Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), the NWS migrated AWIPS from HP-UX to RHEL, which ran on faster Intel hardware. The WSR-88D radar was also upgraded to open hardware running RHEL, which significantly expanded the radar’s post processing capabilities.

  3. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

    I distro hop quite a bit. Currently, I’m running Linux Mint 15 on my desktop and Crunchbang Linux on my server. With Mint’s underlying Ubuntu 13.04 soon running out of support, and the harder-than-it-needs-to-be nature of upgrading Mint, my desktop will soon be upgraded to Fedora 20. My laptop is an old MacBook Pro that runs Fedora 20 through VMware Fusion. I’ve been impressed with Fedora 20 and it’s a good platform with which to stay current on the future technologies in RHEL.

  4. What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?

    I personally prefer GNOME 3. I’ve tried KDE and really like it, but there’s just so many knobs to turn to get it like I want it. GNOME 3 is simple and it gets out of my way. There are still a few areas where I think it needs to mature, and I’m sure it will. I see myself as a GNOME user for many years.

  5. What one piece of software do you depend upon with this distribution? Why is it so important?

    I develop web pages for our internal situational awareness server at work. We have thin clients (LTSP) with 42-inch monitors that contain supplementary weather information from sources internal and external to the NWS. I also like work on the family intranet at home. Besides the Chrome browser and GNOME Terminal, the app that I spend most of my time in is Geany. It’s my go-to app for web development.

  6. What kind of hardware do you run this setup on?

    My home desktop is an Intel Core i7 Ivy Bridge, with SSD and 16GB RAM. I hope to soon pass on my old MacBook Pro to my wife, so that I can buy a System76 Kudu Professional. It’ll be nice to run Linux natively on a powerful laptop, with all the hardware visualization support and a higher resolution screen. I’m just waiting on available funds. :)

  7. Will you share a screenshot of your desktop?

    This screenshot is from my Fedora 20 VM.

Phil Baker's desktop

Interview conducted January 10, 2014


The Linux Setup is a feature where I interview people about their Linux setups. The concept is borrowed, if not outright stolen, from this site. If you’d like to participate, drop me a line.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.


Tuesday, January 7, 2014

The Linux Setup - Allan Day, GNOME Designer

Part of the reason GNOME is such a successful project is the focus and dedication of its members. I’ve interviewed a few of them and common strands always emerge — ideas like GNOME as an operating system, GNOME staying out of the user’s way, and GNOME as a way to enhance Linux. Allan, a designer for the project, touches on a lot of these points. His design workflow is also wonderfully straightforward and helps to address the concern that good design work can’t be done on Linux.

You can find more of The Linux Setup here.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here and follow me on Twitter here.

  1. Who are you, and what do you do?

    My name is Allan Day. I live in London and work on the GNOME project as a designer. I contributed for a number of years as a volunteer before being hired by Red Hat to work on the project full-time.

  2. Why do you use Linux?

    I was dissatisfied with Windows and wanted to try something different. When I tried my first distro I found that I really liked GNOME.

  3. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

    I’m currently running the Fedora 20 pre-release, so I can get the latest GNOME version.

  4. What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?

    Obviously I use GNOME, but I don’t really think of it as a desktop environment. The GNOME project has learned that you have to take a holistic view of the whole product if you want to create good user experiences. It is for this reason that, over the years, our contributors have created low-level technologies when they have been needed. It is also why we regularly collaborate with developers from every level of the stack, going right down to the kernel.

    Nowadays my engagement with GNOME is driven by a belief in the necessity of a competitive Free Software operating system for personal computing devices. I think that GNOME is unique in its focus on user experience, working in the open, and working with others to create a complete product. GNOME 3 is something that I love to use, but it is also important for the future of software.

    The main things I like as a user of GNOME are the lack of distraction, clarity of organization, and the feeling I get that the software is working for me (rather than the other way around). Anything else I try feels distracting and confused in comparison. Often it feels downright unfriendly. GNOME 3 lets me do what I want without getting in the way.

  5. What one piece of software do you depend upon with this distribution? Why is it so important?

    My main tools are Inkscape, Git and IRC — Inkscape for creating mockups, Git for sharing those mockups with others (we have public repositories for all our designs), and IRC for communication. Each of those tools reflects an aspect of the design work that I do; it’s all about developing and sharing ideas in collaboration with others.

    It is important to me that these tools are free, both in terms of cost and liberty. This makes it easy for collaborators to get involved, and is consistent with the goals of the GNOME project as a whole.

  6. What kind of hardware do you run this setup on?

    My hardware isn’t particularly special. I have a Thinkpad T420s, which is generally docked and used in conjunction with a 24” Dell Ultrasharp Monitor, as well as a separate keyboard and mouse. The monitor makes drawing mockups a lot easier.

    I also listen to a lot of music and have the laptop connected to a fairly decent stereo (Sherwood amplifier, Eltax speakers).

  7. Will you share a screenshot of your desktop?

    Sure! This is what my setup tends to look like while I’m working - a browser, Inkscape, Notes, IRC, and a Terminal for Git and building development code.

    I tend to use all of the latest GNOME apps. In this screenshot you can see Web, Notes, and our new IRC client, which is called Polari.

Allan Day's desktop

Interview conducted October 24, 2013


The Linux Setup is a feature where I interview people about their Linux setups. The concept is borrowed, if not outright stolen, from this site. If you’d like to participate, drop me a line.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.


Sunday, September 8, 2013

The Linux Setup - Bastien Nocera, GNOME/Red Hat

Bastien is my second GNOME developer in three weeks! Like Emmanuele Bassi, Bastien has a commitment to improving things for users, which in his case means GNOME. Interestingly, Bastien points out how GNOME’s work has been used to improve other desktop environments, which is the power of free and open source software.

You can find more of The Linux Setup here.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here and follow me on Twitter here.

  1. Who are you, and what do you do?

    I’m Bastien Nocera. I work on GNOME for Red Hat’s Desktop Team from my home in Lyon, France. I’m the maintainer for GNOME’s Settings, which means that I get to work on things like integration of Wacom tablets, geolocation, fingerprint readers, power management, Bluetooth and many more interesting things, with colleagues and community members.

  2. Why do you use Linux?

    I’ll rephrase the question slightly if you don’t mind (EDITOR’S NOTE: I don’t.). I use the Linux kernel, sure, but I also use a lot of tools and libraries on top of that.

    The reason why I started using Linux distributions was because I was curious, and it was different, but that was a long time ago. Nowadays it would be because it’s something that I can help build and that can solve people’s problems, whether it’s improving the everyday experience, as with GNOME 3, or building something that fits Free Software values (such as freedom or privacy).

  3. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

    I use Fedora on all the devices that can run it, and even some that shouldn’t be able to :)

  4. What desktop environment do you use and why do you use it?

    GNOME.

    I started GNOME using it for its looks, back in the 1.0 days, but I stayed for the goals that the project set out. People related to the GNOME project set out to fix problems in the desktop by fixing them from the ground up, and you’ll see many technologies on typical Linux desktops that are from that era, from D-Bus up to the very latest color management.

    If you connect to Wi-Fi in Xfce, color calibrate your display in KDE, or use your Bluetooth headset in Unity, you’re probably using software that GNOME developers wrote.

  5. What one piece of software do you depend upon with this distribution? Why is it so important?

    I don’t think there’s one particular piece of software that I use that’s only available to Fedora. What Fedora does have is a great community of developers and packagers that will get the latest software from upstream and make sure it integrates nicely with the distribution. So when we rely on features and fixes from the kernel, the display drivers, or even a GNOME library, we can be sure that it will be in Fedora in a timely manner.

  6. What kind of hardware do you run this setup on?

    An all-in-one desktop from Lenovo, and a MacBook Air that doesn’t run MacOS X.

  7. Will you share a screenshot of your desktop?

    It’s stock GNOME 3 running on Fedora, so it’s fairly boring. I usually use the keyboard to switch between windows when I’m coding so this screenshot isn’t quite an accurate representation of my running setup.

Bastien Nocera's desktop

Interview conducted July 25, 2013


The Linux Setup is a feature where I interview people about their Linux setups. The concept is borrowed, if not outright stolen, from this site. If you’d like to participate, drop me a line.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.