Wednesday, March 12, 2014 Wednesday, February 26, 2014 Tuesday, January 14, 2014

linux-website-screenshots:

DistroWatch est. 2001

This is a project I did as part of an Internet Archive Tumblr residency.

The other projects will live at http://internetarchive.tumblr.com/. I think they’re releasing one a week. I’m sure they’ll be worth checking out.

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 Thursday, October 3, 2013

Book Excerpt: The Rise of Linux in the Cloud

cover of The Librarian's Guide to Academic Research in the Cloud

As I mentioned yesterday, my book, The Librarian’s Guide to Academic Research in the Cloud is now out. The book focuses on how to think about and use cloud services in academic research, but the final chapter looks to the future of cloud computing. This is an excerpt from that chapter that seemed to belong here.

The Rise of Linux

Related to the potential rise of thin clients is the potential rise of the Linux operating system. Linux is based upon the Unix operating system and has historically been seen as a powerful, common server tool that is also used by some people as a desktop operating system. While there’s a wide range of software available for Linux, the desktop software ecosystem has never been able to compete with either Windows or OS X. Because of this lack of commercial software, Linux adaptation has been low, although there are quite a few vocal enthusiasts and public Linux communities. Enough so that despite the low adaptation rate, many of the services discussed within this book have some sort of Linux client. But because so many cloud services are designed to be interacted with via a browser, Linux has become a much more viable choice for users who wish to explore an alternative operating system, either for political, economic, or usability reasons.

As mentioned previously, Linux is based upon the Unix operating system. Linux is open source, meaning users can modify it. Linux is also cost-free. In fact, much of the work of Linux is built on the work of unpaid contributors around the world. The fact that it is open source means the code is always publicly available for anyone to use or to work with. This contrasts with OS X, Windows,and iOS, all of which use a proprietary code base to which only employees of the companies connected to the operating system have access.

Users seem to choose desktop Linux for several reasons. Many users gravitate to Linux because of its open source philosophy. Others choose it because it tends to be more customizable than proprietary operating systems, which need to restrict access to their code for competitive purposes. Others choose Linux because it is cost free. And others choose it because it tends to run better on older hardware, although that depends upon the type of Linux software being used.

A common barrier to entry for Linux for many has always been software. For instance, while there is a version of Microsoft Office for Windows and for OS X, there is none for Linux. And while there are many word processors for Linux, as mentioned in chapter 5, it can often be challenging to share work between two different versions of word processors. But with the rise of services available in the browser, Linux users no longer need to worry about compatibility. A Zoho document will open in any desktop web browser, regardless of the operating system powering the browser. Someone looking to experiment with Linux does not need to worry about finding the right Linux software to work with a file. Instead, the user can just use her browser and go ahead with her work.

Just as thin clients are a viable tool because so much work can be done using the browser, Linux also becomes a more viable choice when users do not need to worry about local software.

The Librarian’s Guide to Academic Research in the Cloud is available from Chandos Publishing. It is also available as an e-book on Chandos Publishing Online.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.


Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Writing a Book with Linux

cover of The Librarian's Guide to Academic Research in the Cloud

I spent the past year writing The Librarian’s Guide to Academic Research in the Cloud, a book which focuses on using and thinking about cloud services in an academic research context. I’m fortunate enough to belong to a union that negotiated research leave for new faculty, and that leave made the book possible.

The content of the book might be interesting to Linux users (here is an excerpt), but I wanted to talk about the process for writing the book, which was very Linux-intensive.

Before starting the book, I had heard a lot of horror stories about people forced to use crazy Word stylesheets and templates from publishers. I was very glad that my publisher didn’t use anything like that, which might have forced me to spend more time in Windows. I decided to work with RTF files and used LibreOffice to write the whole thing.

Working with LibreOffice as much as I did was an interesting process. At work, I use Word for word processing and at home I use gedit until I absolutely need to format something. So I hadn’t spent very much time with LibreOffice. It was fine, but there were some rough edges that made it feel a few iterations behind Word. For instance, I wasn’t able to get a running word count going, even though there’s supposed to be an extension to do that. Fonts seemed to change between opening and closing a file. And one file kept getting wiped because I had an HTML link at the start of the file. Nothing cataclysmic happened, but using LibreOffice was not as smooth as using Word. Word is crazy and convoluted, but for the most part, it’s stable and stays out of your way. LibreOffice occasionally acted up and while nothing completely wrecked my project, I don’t find myself suddenly writing in it now that I no longer need to.

screenshot of text in LibreOffice

Despite some of its limitations, one LibreOffice feature I love is the ability to generate a PDF of a document in one click. I had to deal with permissions, so I just created a permission template that let me easily turn permissions forms into PDFs, which I then emailed out. This was much easier in LibreOffice than it would have been in Word, where I would have needed to convert the files to PDFs using Save As, or that weird Adobe button that takes forever to export the PDF. The Gmail canned message option (available in Labs) was also very helpful when it came time to send out the permissions. The whole permissions process required very little typing, which is always nice.

I’ve recently heard good things about XMLmind, which is used, among other things, to generate DocBook. It’s something I want to further explore for long-form writing. And I’m also curious to see if pandoc, recently mentioned by Bryan Behrenshausen, might be a good option for me.

In terms of images, I did as much as I could with GIMP and the default GNOME Screenshot tool and that was super simple. I know some people hate GIMP, but once you get used to it (and it took me quite a while to get used to it), it’s powerful and effective. I don’t know if I’ll ever find it easy to use, but it can be conquered.

I was terrified of losing work, so I used SpiderOak as my main backup tool, but then also manually uploaded files into Dropbox every time they were updated. One of the things I like about SpiderOak is that it can be configured to run on demand, only backing up files when I ask it to. That keeps my machine running pretty quickly, where I find the Dropbox client often slows things down. Uploading files into the web interface was painless, though.

I tried to focus the book on cross-platform tools as much as I could, but the reality is that there’s an awful lot of stuff that doesn’t run on Linux. For those situations, I had a virtual machine running XP (via VirtualBox) and it proved to be a life-saver in terms of testing Windows-only tools. It also turned out to be very helpful for installing software I knew I didn’t want on my Linux install. Rather than installing and uninstalling and then cleaning up files, I used the XP image as my sandbox. Toward the end of my book, I had an RTF file (my index) LibreOffice couldn’t open and WordPad on the XP partition saved my bacon, allowing me to open the document and copy-and-paste the text into something LibreOffice could edit. Even with the book completed, the XP partition has come in handy a few times. It’s a nice little safety net for those very rare times there’s something that can only be done in Windows (or when I want to quickly check something on a second machine).

My organizational system wasn’t super cohesive, but it worked for me. I used a combination of SimpleNote and Google Docs/Drive. SimpleNote was used for general notes to myself about what needed to be changed, added, or removed from each chapter (the challenge of writing a print book about web tools is that everything is constantly shifting on you). Google Docs was used for tracking the book’s glossary, plus a spreadsheet of what was going on in each chapter, in terms of the pronoun used (I alternated between he and she), the word count, and any notes that weren’t in SimpleNote. I’m now pretty into Evernote (more on that in a future post), so any future projects will probably be tracked entirely in there, but this system worked very well for me. Having said that, I would love to see Evernote have some kind of native table feature in its web interface because I like seeing information in grids. Especially since I recently discovered Evernote’s table-formatting button.

Once the book was typeset, proofing was handled via the annotation tools within Adobe Reader. I wound up having to install the Linux version of Reader (I had no idea such a thing even existed), and while it didn’t render as well as it does on Windows, I was able to successfully input my changes without any drama. I did double-check the file on a Windows machine to make sure everything made it in, though.

Writing a more complex, long-form work using desktop Linux was remarkably simple. The tools all worked, plus I didn’t have to deal with crashes or lags. One of the central points of my book is that web-based tools free us up in terms of the operating system we can work with. OpenSUSE 12.1 and GNOME 3 made for a fantastic work environment. Linux is great for checking email and Facebook, but it’s also great for serious knowledge work, too. Anyone on the fence about a long-form project in Linux should give it a shot. I’d be shocked if they left disappointed.

The Librarian’s Guide to Academic Research in the Cloud is available from Chandos Publishing. It is also available as an e-book on Chandos Publishing Online.

You can follow My Linux Rig on Google+ here, follow me on Twitter here, and subscribe to the feed here.


Saturday, September 21, 2013

Notes from LinuxCon 2013

I’m back from LinuxCon and it’s already been fairly well covered, so I just wanted to share some of my quick impressions:

  • Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, is very dynamic and charismatic. He’s a great face for Linux. I can see where CEOs, CFOs, and CTOs would feel very comfortable interacting with him. This was the first time I saw him in action and I was very impressed.
  • A recurring theme was that Linux had won the desktop wars via Android. Zemlin said we were at the end of an OS era and that the desktop is less relevant now, which is probably true for the average user, but I think the people who need to use a desktop are really counting on desktop Linux.
  • Dirk Hohndel of Intel also made the case that Linux was killing it on clients, so the desktop market was less important, although he also cited the success of the Chromebook. He also mentioned how the Chromebook and Ubuntu don’t present themselves as Linux, and didn’t seem very enthused by that.
  • I didn’t see a lot of attention given to this, but Eben Upton of the Rasberry Pi Foundation demonstrated a Rasberry Pi acting as a desktop and using Wayland. It’s still early, but it’s a very interesting Pi application. Upton’s talk, which was great, is online.
  • Greg Kroah-Hartman’s talk on the state of the Linux kernel was fantastic (he also served his slides off of a Rasberry Pi, which was pretty cool). In general, I was amazed at the quality of the talks. I knew the content would be solid, but the presentations themselves were almost uniformly great. The slides were engaging and no one read off of them, which is definitely a thing at many technology conferences.
  • Linus Torvalds spoke on a kernel panel on the last day of the conference. Needless to say, the room was more than full. No one fainted, which I guess was good.
  • My talk seemed to go OK, although I’m probably not the best judge. I ran into someone who said they enjoyed my talk, which left me feeling good. But then he ended with “You kind of got heckled at the end, didn’t you?” I hadn’t thought I was heckled, so I’m just trying not to think about it. The slides are here. The heckles go in the comments below.

Tuesday, September 10, 2013
I’m presenting at LinuxCon September 16 at 10:35 AM. I hope to meet some readers and interview subjects in-person. I’m still working on my presentation, but I wanted to share a few slides early, just so you can get a sense of what you can expect. I’ll post the presentation (sadly, the whole thing isn’t an animated gif) once it’s ready.

I’m presenting at LinuxCon September 16 at 10:35 AM. I hope to meet some readers and interview subjects in-person. I’m still working on my presentation, but I wanted to share a few slides early, just so you can get a sense of what you can expect. I’ll post the presentation (sadly, the whole thing isn’t an animated gif) once it’s ready.